Having Trouble With An Existing Court Order?

A divorce is just the beginning of a new life; one that may change significantly after several years. You may find a new job, or lose your old one. You may want to move near relatives in another state. A medical condition could arise that requires time and money to treat. Or maybe you are not getting the money you are owed in an existing child or spousal support order.

Experienced family law attorney Randy Mora can help. A lawyer with a history of successful results, Mr. Mora can walk you through your various options and discuss with you clearly and honestly whether a petition to modify or enforce an existing order is right for your situation.

We regularly handle cases involving:

  • Changes to the amount of child support
  • Changes to child custody arrangements
  • Modifying spousal support (alimony)
  • Getting past due child support for the custodial parent

When A Modification To Child Custody Or Support Orders May Be Appropriate

Significant changes in circumstances can result in modifications to child custody and support orders.

However, you cannot simply stop paying child support, demand more money or refuse to drop off your children at a designated time. Doing this can result in serious penalties, including the potential for criminal charges.

Changing Child Custody

Potential changes that can result in a modification to an existing custody and visitation order include:

  • A Substantial Change, which could include things like a criminal conviction, medical condition or remarriage
  • The Child's Preference, if the child is at least 12 years old and wants a change
  • Relinquishment by one parent, if that parent has voluntarily given up custody for more than six months (not related to military deployment).

Modifying Child Support

Our most common modification case involves child support. There are various factors involved in modifying a child support order. You can read more about child support modifications and whether you qualify here.

We Help Enforce Orders

Another frequent concern is the enforcement of existing child support orders. Child support amounts are generally set by the state according to guidelines. Unfortunately, some parents refuse to pay this amount.

There are several options for custodial parents to enforce an existing child support order. The court has the ability to garnish (take) wages and tax refunds, as well as take punitive action like suspend the nonpaying parent's driver's license and passport.

Our office has significant experience with enforcing child support orders. We also help clients who have been summoned to child support court by the attorney general for alleged child support order violations.

The Sooner You Contact Us, The Better

Time matters in modification and enforcement actions. Simply leaving the situation as is can result in serious financial difficulty.

To begin protecting your rights through a petition to modify or enforce an existing court order, schedule your initial consultation by calling our San Antonio office at 210-446-0306.